FAQs

Have a different question than the ones listed below? Use the form on the right to submit your question.

Billing

Yes. It is now common practice for any company that grants credit to request a credit application from customers.

Delivery

The cold temps and winter weather have set in. Be ready for whatever this season brings - below freezing temperatures, snow, ice, wind, or all the above. Here are a few reminders for the winter season. Stay warm and safe this winter.

Mark your tank.

Mark your tank with a brightly colored stake or flag taller than the maximum anticipated snow depth. This is important as it allows service and emergency personnel to locate it safely at all times.

Clear a path.

Make a clear path, one free of snow and ice, to your fuel tank and your driveway. This helps the delivery drivers get to your tank easily, fill quickly, and make it safer for everyone.

Clear your vents.

Clear snow and ice away from outdoor vents, chimneys, and flues to prevent blocking ventilation. Improper venting can cause carbon monoxide to become trapped in your home, causing serious illness or even death.

Be aware that as it gets colder, particularly during prolonged frigid weather, heating systems run longer and more frequently to keep the home comfortable. Therefore more fuel will be used in a shorter amount of time.

Adequate Supply.

For safety and efficiency reasons, it is important to maintain an adequate supply of fuel in your tank. If you are a Will Call customer, check your tank regularly and fill up to maintain adequate supply.

Use energy wisely.

Be conservative with your energy by setting your thermostat to as low as is comfortable — possibly a few degrees cooler at night and when nobody is home. Close off any rooms that don’t need to be heated.

Safe appliances.

Never use a stove or bring your gas grill indoors for space heating, even during a power outage. Only use appliances indoors that are designed and approved for that purpose.

If you are an Automatic Delivery customer, we will monitor your consumption and fill your tank(s) when you are due (which is approximately at 30%). If you are on Will Call delivery, we request that you call to schedule a delivery when your tank gauge reads 30% for propane or 1/4 full for heating oil.

Fuel Safety

The cold temps and winter weather have set in. Be ready for whatever this season brings - below freezing temperatures, snow, ice, wind, or all the above. Here are a few reminders for the winter season. Stay warm and safe this winter.

Mark your tank.

Mark your tank with a brightly colored stake or flag taller than the maximum anticipated snow depth. This is important as it allows service and emergency personnel to locate it safely at all times.

Clear a path.

Make a clear path, one free of snow and ice, to your fuel tank and your driveway. This helps the delivery drivers get to your tank easily, fill quickly, and make it safer for everyone.

Clear your vents.

Clear snow and ice away from outdoor vents, chimneys, and flues to prevent blocking ventilation. Improper venting can cause carbon monoxide to become trapped in your home, causing serious illness or even death.

Be aware that as it gets colder, particularly during prolonged frigid weather, heating systems run longer and more frequently to keep the home comfortable. Therefore more fuel will be used in a shorter amount of time.

Adequate Supply.

For safety and efficiency reasons, it is important to maintain an adequate supply of fuel in your tank. If you are a Will Call customer, check your tank regularly and fill up to maintain adequate supply.

Use energy wisely.

Be conservative with your energy by setting your thermostat to as low as is comfortable — possibly a few degrees cooler at night and when nobody is home. Close off any rooms that don’t need to be heated.

Safe appliances.

Never use a stove or bring your gas grill indoors for space heating, even during a power outage. Only use appliances indoors that are designed and approved for that purpose.

Click here for a few tips to keep you prepared, warm, and safe during the cold winter months.

First and foremost, you can tell there is a gas leak by the smell. As a protective measure for your safety, a strong odor is added to the propane so that you will easily be able to detect the smell. It resembles the smell of a skunk or rotten eggs (ew!). Make sure your entire family can recognize the odor of propane.

Under some conditions, such as when people have colds, allergies or sinus congestion, or there is a presence of strong cooking odors, you may not smell a gas leak; therefore, it is recommended that you purchase a propane gas/carbon monoxide detector and install it in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions. Call us for additional information.

There are a few reasons you may need to turn off your propane tank – you smell gas and you suspect a leak or you’ve run out of propane. Here’s a quick video on how to turn your tank off.

Yes, when used properly. Although propane gas is naturally colorless and odorless, an odor is added to alert users in the event of a leak. To be familiar with the odor of propane gas, ask us for a sniff test. It’s a pungent aroma similar to that of a skunk or rotten eggs. Storage, use, and handling of propane fall under the standards adopted by the National Fire Protection Association, Title 49 USC, and approved by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI).

Close all propane tank or cylinder supply valves. Call us for a fill and system restart.

Take immediate action! If you smell gas in your house, camper, RV, workplace or around any gas equipment:

  • Put out smoking materials and other open flames.
  • Do not turn light switches, appliances or thermostats on or off, and do not use the telephone. An electric spark could ignite the gas.
  • Promptly get everyone out of the building, vehicle, RV, trailer or area.
  • Close all gas tanks or cylinder supply valves.
  • Call us from a neighbor’s telephone.
  • Stay outside until the problem has been corrected.

Heating Oil

Yes! One of the things that allows us to be competitive is our storage capacity. We buy in larger quantities than some fuel dealers, which means a lower cost for us and a lower price for you. That said, it’s also important to remember that as a full-service fuel company our prices may not always be the lowest in our market, but we offer you advantages that fuel discounters don’t. For example, we have a dedicated team of highly trained technicians, who are always on call for you, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week!

If your heating oil tank does not have a gauge on it, you will need to follow the steps below to check for the oil level in your tank.

Step 1: Remove the top fill valve cap.

Step 2: Insert a dry straight stick (one long enough to get to the bottom of the tank) until it reaches the bottom. Mark the stick with a pencil where it meets the top of the fill hole.

Step 3: Once you pull the measuring tool out you can compare the oil level to the top and bottom of your tank. For example, a 275 tank is full at 42 inches.

Step 4: Don’t forget to put the top fill cap back on!

Pricing

The propane business is competitive and each company sets its own pricing policy. Most companies price propane so that the more you buy per year, the less you pay per unit.

Propane prices are usually based on the customer’s estimated annual use. When a customer uses additional propane appliances, total consumption and cost increase but the unit cost may be reduced. By the same token, if propane use decreases, the customer will likely pay a higher price per unit.

Another factor that can determine the price of propane, as with any other fuel, is the cost of acquiring the product from wholesalers. Price fluctuation may vary depending on a number of factors. Advance planning by a consumer can help control these costs (e.g., budget plans, fixed-price programs).

We wish we could tell you, but we have no idea. There are so many factors that could send prices up or down at any time. For example, in 2008, when many analysts were saying oil could go up to $200 a barrel, it dropped to $50 a barrel instead. There’s really no way to predict fuel prices precisely.

Propane dealers operate in a competitive marketplace and prices may vary among companies. Transportation costs contribute to geographic variations in price. Companies like Tri Gas & Oil that provide complete 24-hour-a-day, 7-day-a-week service may be slightly more expensive than companies that offer limited service hours. Also, a few companies only sell propane and offer no other services.

Propane

Some appliances are specifically manufactured to use propane. Some may be converted from natural gas to propane. Mobile or manufactured homes and recreational vehicles must use appliances, such as water heaters and heating equipment, which are approved by the American National Standards Institute for propane use (each appliance should have a manufacturer’s label for its intended use). Also, air intakes are necessary when using propane appliances in these homes, but are not required for standard housing equipment. You can always contact us for more details.

An important note: Do not change the air supply to the appliances in your home. Always follow the manufacturers’ guidelines.

There are a few reasons you may need to turn off your propane tank – you smell gas and you suspect a leak or you’ve run out of propane. Here’s a quick video on how to turn your tank off.

Normally the propane gas company owns all equipment, including the tanks and regulators. Therefore, the price of propane gas to the customer may include a charge for use and maintenance of the equipment. For other fuels, the customer owns the equipment and the price covers only the fuel.

The propane business is competitive and each company sets its own pricing policy. Most companies price propane so that the more you buy per year, the less you pay per unit.

Propane prices are usually based on the customer’s estimated annual use. When a customer uses additional propane appliances, total consumption and cost increase but the unit cost may be reduced. By the same token, if propane use decreases, the customer will likely pay a higher price per unit.

Another factor that can determine the price of propane, as with any other fuel, is the cost of acquiring the product from wholesalers. Price fluctuation may vary depending on a number of factors. Advance planning by a consumer can help control these costs (e.g., budget plans, fixed-price programs).

Yes, when used properly. Although propane gas is naturally colorless and odorless, an odor is added to alert users in the event of a leak. To be familiar with the odor of propane gas, ask us for a sniff test. It’s a pungent aroma similar to that of a skunk or rotten eggs. Storage, use, and handling of propane fall under the standards adopted by the National Fire Protection Association, Title 49 USC, and approved by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI).

In the past there have been no significant disruptions in supplying propane. Approximately 90% of the propane consumed in the United States is produced domestically. Of the remaining 10%, which is imported via pipeline, tanker, boat, or other means of transport, most comes from Canada.

Close all propane tank or cylinder supply valves. Call us for a fill and system restart.

Take immediate action! If you smell gas in your house, camper, RV, workplace or around any gas equipment:

  • Put out smoking materials and other open flames.
  • Do not turn light switches, appliances or thermostats on or off, and do not use the telephone. An electric spark could ignite the gas.
  • Promptly get everyone out of the building, vehicle, RV, trailer or area.
  • Close all gas tanks or cylinder supply valves.
  • Call us from a neighbor’s telephone.
  • Stay outside until the problem has been corrected.

Propane dealers operate in a competitive marketplace and prices may vary among companies. Transportation costs contribute to geographic variations in price. Companies like Tri Gas & Oil that provide complete 24-hour-a-day, 7-day-a-week service may be slightly more expensive than companies that offer limited service hours. Also, a few companies only sell propane and offer no other services.

Tanks

The tank gauge is located on the top of the tank, most of the time under a lid or hood which can be lifted up. Look for a gauge dial with numbers from 5 to 94 – the numbers indicate the percentage of propane in the tank. When the level reaches to 30%, please call our office to schedule a delivery. If you have problems reading your gauge, please give us a call and we’ll help you through it.

There are a few reasons you may need to turn off your propane tank – you smell gas and you suspect a leak or you’ve run out of propane. Here’s a quick video on how to turn your tank off.

Propane tank gauge

With all the numerous propane tank sizes available, how in the world do you determine which size is best for your home or business? That’s the beauty of working with the Energy Experts at Tri Gas & Oil. You won’t have to worry because our Energy Consultants will review your fuel needs and help to develop a fuel plan and appropriate tank size for your application. Each home or business fuel application will be vary based on building size, appliances, and usage type. Below are the tank sizes available with the propane professionals at Tri Gas & Oil.

Propane tank gauge

Keep in mind: Due to the composition of propane, it needs room to expand (heat and cool) in the tank. So because of that, propane tanks are only filled to 80% capacity.

Tank SizeLocationPositionCapacity (at 80%)Usage
59 GallonAboveground onlyUpright47 gallonsGreat for residential use including cooking, fireplace, clothes drying.
120 GallonAboveground or undergroundHorizontal96 gallonsPerfect for pool heating, fireplaces, hot water heaters, and supplemental heat solutions.
124 Gallon (420)Aboveground only Upright100 gallonsThese tanks are excellent for pool heating, fireplaces, hot water heaters (our tankless hot water heaters are super efficient), and whole home heating (dual tanks).
250 GallonAboveground or undergroundHorizontal200 gallonsGreat for whole home heating, generators, and homes with multiple propane appliances.
330 GallonAboveground or undergroundHorizontal264 gallonsUsed in applications for whole home heating, generators, and homes with multiple propane appliances.
500 GallonAboveground or undergroundHorizontal400 gallonsThese tanks are used for homes with whole home heating, generators, and homes with multiple appliances.
1,000 GallonAboveground or undergroundHorizontal800 gallonsUsed for the Propane-Powered Home and commercial applications. Our Energy Consultants would be happy to provide you with more information on each of these sizes and develop a propane solution perfect for your home or business.


Propane tank gauge

Weather Tips

Click here for a few tips to keep you prepared, warm, and safe during the cold winter months.

Load More

Loading

  • TriGas & Oil Co, Fuel Oil, Federalsburg, MD

  • We Deliver the Promise.
  • 3941 Federalsburg Hwy.
  • P.O. Box 465
  • Federalsburg, MD 21632
  • Call Us: 800-638-7802